Delaware became the 11th state to join the forces of marriage equality on Tuesday. With this momentous week for the equal rights movement, we decided to begin a Marriage Equality Census, keeping an estimated count of the number of self-identified LGBT citizens that can legally get married in their home state. See the number in the graphic above.
Here’s how we got to this grand number: We pulled 2012 U.S. Census Bureau data of the population for each state that has full marriage equality (not civil unions). Then we combined it with information gathered by a 2012 Gallup poll in conjunction with the Williams Institute at UCLA, which identified the percent of self-identified LGBT people in each of those states. See the table below for the numbers.
Which state will be next? —Scott McPherson

Delaware became the 11th state to join the forces of marriage equality on Tuesday. With this momentous week for the equal rights movement, we decided to begin a Marriage Equality Census, keeping an estimated count of the number of self-identified LGBT citizens that can legally get married in their home state. See the number in the graphic above.

Here’s how we got to this grand number: We pulled 2012 U.S. Census Bureau data of the population for each state that has full marriage equality (not civil unions). Then we combined it with information gathered by a 2012 Gallup poll in conjunction with the Williams Institute at UCLA, which identified the percent of self-identified LGBT people in each of those states. See the table below for the numbers.

Which state will be next? —Scott McPherson